Convert a Column or Rows of Data into Comma Separated Values




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CSV. This is the acronym for comma separated values or Cash Surrender Value (if you are selling insurance). But this is not an insurance blog so I’ll stick with the former definition. If you work with data, sometimes you get it in one format and you’ve got to put it into another format to get more data. In this case you get a list of values in a column and you’d need to take that list and input it into some program to get more data. But the input there is one input field and it takes the list in a CSV format. Basically all…

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42 thoughts on “Convert a Column or Rows of Data into Comma Separated Values

    Angie Richardson

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Thank you – exactly what I needed!

    Brian Wright

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Thanks, amigo

    Big Bend Continuum of Care

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    sir….you saved me today. great walkthrough, THANK YOU. #stillemployed #reportbuildingsuckssometimes

    in2Rafi

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    I think I have another easy formula. I made a separate video on this too. But anyway your method is also working. I learned a new one too. God bless you.

    Rochelle Aprigliano

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    THANK YOU!!! Awesome for use in SQL

    this method is wrong for huge amount of data.
    please! use the following function
    =CONCATENATE(A2,",")
    and then copy this function to all.

    Kevin Taylor

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Simple and just what I needed, thanks

    Brendan Fleming

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Thank for simple step by step instructions. Well done!

    Sam Qaderi

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    This was awesome! Thanks so much!

    Katie Howley

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Thank you!!!!

    Brad Aguilar

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Thank you! quick lesson and im off!

    Scott Unkefer

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    I second retlem. Thank you kind sir.

    chandan sharma

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Thanks man, you saved me hell lot of time.
    Thanks a lot

    Davida Camillo

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Thank you so much!

    flipflopsneeded

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    how do you do it the other way around. The list into a single column with individual cells?

    Sanket Adhvaryu

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Time Saver. Thank you for the video.

    Angela Christenson

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    thank you!

    Kathy Nelson

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Thank you that was very helpful!!!

    Senad Zeco

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    In Excel 2010 the separator is not the comma but ;

    Stephen Tock

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Wow! Thank you — excellent lesson!

    zionram

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Use the TEXTJOIN function. Way easier! Look it up! Your welcome

    Lifetime Paradigm, Inc.

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    I thought that this is awesome and exactly what I needed. However, I have 184 rows to concatenate. This "appears" to stops working after about 44 rows. I'm guessing this is due to the 256 character length limit. With a little more research, however, I discovered that your forumula does, in fact, work correctly. Excel, however, cannot display more than 256 characters in a single cell. When I pasted the contents of the cell to a Text file, all my data were there! Thank you.

    IamBeauteConfidential

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    AWESOME!!! Very detailed and easy to understand. Thanks for keeping it simple yet detailed enough for the Excel challenged community 🙂

    Kelvin Chung

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Thanks buddy. That helps resolve my adhoc task.

    Preston Robinson III

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    OMG…THANK YOU!

    jegadeeshwar

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    you saved my time…. thanks a lot

    Its Me

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Life Saver!!!

    Tammy Mark

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    So easy to follow thank you so much!!!!

    Anish Malik

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Good Tutorial

    SirDavidHealy

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Thanks man, this helped me out of a tricky spot with a deadline fast approaching.

    Jo Judnick Wilson

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Hi, So I used the convert text to columns function in order to copy data under the right headings for an import, but in order to complete my import it would appear I need to now convert the columns of data (about 15), back to comma separated again. How do I do that. It is a .csv template file that I downloaded and needs to upload as a csv again. I am using Excel 2016 on a Mac if that makes any difference

    dandygrow

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Excellent! Such a simple tool put to such a great use. Thanks!

    Haroon Usman

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Doug H you did great, you solve my big problem with in 3 minutes . thank you and love you very much

    Shahid Munir

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    very efficient method but if we have red color of 3 cells values of the tutorial list and we need formula only to concentrate those red color cells data in one cell in the whole list

    Steve Link

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Thanks – this helped a lot!

    Davey Givens

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    I keep trying this and it doesn't apply uniformly to every cell. Driving me nuts! Is it because some cells formulas? FYI, the non-formula'd cells are the ones not reacting. HELP!

    mahi santosh

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Thnq bro u solve my problems

    rfpriddy1951

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    There is an easier way to accomplish this. In the column to the right of the first cell you wish to add the comma, or again, any other symbol, enter the (+) and column name for the column you wish to add the comma to, for example +A1, then &",". So the destination cell would read, +A1&"," now press enter. Then simply fill the entire column length and you're done. You can use several methods to fill… drag, double click on the lower right corner of the first target cell, etc… I'm sure you know how to do this.

    Jennifer Khattar

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    hi doug, thanks for the video.
    I have a problem when applying your method:
    I need to convert every row into a comma separated text,. one of my columns is a date, where the others are just numbers : mm-dd-yy hhmm, and when i use your method, that part turns into a general number. I tried to customize it according to a date, but to no avail. Do you know how to fix this problem? Or anyone who's reading this? Please help. Thanks

    Etienne D

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    Life saver,
    Used for WITSML transmission data gap retrieve.
    thanks a lot.

    Jasbir yadav

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    VERY EFFECTIVE SOLUTION,GREAT

    Anu GB

    (October 22, 2018 - 9:26 pm)

    hi Doug.. This is working, but not completely. i have a huge data set which i am trying on. around 80k. which are divided into 20k files. when i tired 20kth row, the last copied was 17041. and when i tried 10kth, the last copied was 7022. can you let me know what is the issue?

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